CAD (Computer Aided Design) remote learning CPD

Wednesday 24th June, 5pm- 7pm, £25

This course was a great success, here’s one tweet about it:

Primary Computing CAD Sketchup Car
Example of Year 5 pupil Sketchup Car

Due to popular demand, I’m delivering some online training for how to use, and get the best out of, 3D design software in Primary Schools. I’m going to be using Sketchup which is a powerful (and free!) tool which can either be downloaded and installed, or used within a browser (note: online use required an email sign up).

The cost is £25 for the 2 hour evening session, and you can sign up via Park House School CPD Network or by clicking on the flyer:

Primary Computing Run Don't Walk Training - CAD (Sketchup)
Run Don’t Walk Training – CAD (Sketchup) – Click on flyer to sign up

Using Computer Aided/Assisted Design (CAD) in primary schools is often overlooked. In KS2 especially, CAD usually and disappointingly results in pupils merely printing a 2D net, or creating a poster to advertise a product.

Primary Computing CAD Sketchup Cow Plan
A Year 6 design in Sketchup for their Crumble Robot

This session will reveal how true 3D product design is achievable (and free!) not just for the DT curriculum, but also to serve in background/ sprite design within Computing as well as helping to meet the requirement of pupils needing to be able to select and use a wide range of software for specific purposes.

Using Sketchup Make 2017 (free for users within education), this session will cover creating basic 3D models, annotating, creating scale models with measurements, creating 2D images of these models as multi-viewpoint plans and cross sectional diagrams.

Primary Computing Santas Workshop CAD Sketchup
Year 4 Sketchup design for Santa’s North Pole Complex

Pupils should be taught to: select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information

National Curriculum – Computing KS2

Pupils should be taught to: generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design

National Curriculum – Design Technology KS2

KS1 and KS2 training in specialist computing areas

Primary Computing remote CPD courses
Primary Computing Remote CPD Courses

Phil Bagge and I are delivering remote training sessions on some of the more niche areas of the computing curriculum. From Physical Computing to 3D design, take you pick in this quality (yet cheap – only £40) training opportunity.

Download the PDF flyer below and you can click on each course title to book on.

For even more CPD opportunities in both primary and secondary, please visit:

Park House School CPD Network – remote and online training

Free CPD in Primary Computing

There is a new wave of primary and secondary CPD, free for teachers in state schools in England, being released by the NCCE. For a full catalogue of courses you can book on to, please head to www.teachcomputing.org

Here are the courses that I am running, hosted by Park House Computing Hub. Click on the flyer to book on…

Primary Computing - NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course - May 2020
Primary Computing – NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course – May 2020
Primary Computing - NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course - June 2020
Primary Computing – NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course – June 2020
Primary Computing - NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course - July 2020
Primary Computing – NCCE Programming and Algorithms Course – July 2020

I’ve been delivering the Primary Programming and Algorithms course remotely since lockdown; here is some feedback from some of my delegates:

Now I feel more confident with teaching the various skills required for primary computing; I cannot wait to apply what I have learnt in the classroom! Thank you so much!

KS1 Teacher

Learned loads more about Scratch – definitely feeling a lot more confident in terms of teaching from the algorithm stage to then applying it to the coding with the selection aspects! Was also a great laugh connecting with others in these isolated times! Thanks so much – got loads of great ideas to use in the classroom!

KS2 Teacher

Feeling much more confident to teach selection and variables. I think the practical classroom activities will prove really useful to introduce algorithms and programming within my own class. As an NQT this is something that I will take forward and implement in my classroom as as soon as possible 🙂

NQT

Thank you Phil! I’ve never learnt through remote access before but have  enjoyed it so much. I now need to ‘play’ with Scratch and learn for myself. You have gone above and beyond to answer questions and provide support for us and share your valuable resources.

Deputy Head

Final call for free Primary Computing training

Dear primary colleagues, there are still spaces left on the NCCE ‘Programming and Algorithms in Primary Computing’ course that Park House Computing Hub are hosting, before the NCCE review their remote learning process in May. It is unknown what the remote learning will look like after the end of April.

I’m delivering this one day course in the second week of the Easter Holidays, and splitting it into 4 x 2 hour sessions (across Tuesday 14th and the Friday 17th, 10am -12, then 1pm – 3pm). All the other courses I’m running in April are fully booked, so please hurry!

The course is FREE for any primary school teacher, teaching in a state school in England. Simply book on using the link at the bottom of this page.

This is the same course I ran last week with 17 delegates, which was a tremendous success. Here are some testimonials:

I have thoroughly enjoyed this morning’s training. Easy to follow and great trainer. Because I haven’t used scratch before I found it hard to do the activities myself but it was useful being able to watch you do them step by step. 

Computing subject lead on Programming and Algorithms in Primary Computing course, facilitated by Phil Wickins

Thank you Phil! I’ve never learnt through remote access before but have  enjoyed it so much. I now need to ‘play’ with Scratch and learn for myself. You have gone above and beyond to answer questions and provide support for us and share your valuable resources. Keep safe and look after you and your family.

Assistant Head Teacher on Programming and Algorithms in Primary Computing course, facilitated by Phil Wickins

Feeling much more confident to teach selection and variables. I think the practical classroom activities will prove really useful to introduce algorithms and programming within my own class. As an NQT this is something that I will take forward and implement in my classroom as soon as possible 🙂

NQT on Programming and Algorithms in Primary Computing course, facilitated by Phil Wickins

Course details and booking is below. I hope to see you there on Tuesday!!

Programming and Algorithms for Primary Computing – Facilitated by Phil Wickins

primary computing NCCE Teach Computing

Online Computing Training – with bursary

Hello primary teachers! During this time of remote learning, I’d like to offer you the opportunity to take part in live online CPD. If this is the first NCCE course for your school, your school will receive a bursary of £220. The course itself costs £35, but rather than invoicing you, the NCCE will simply pay your school £185 on completion of the course. This is available for ANY STATE SCHOOL IN ENGLAND.

Book on now! I will be delivering the courses below, please ensure you have signed up with www.teachcomptuing.org first.

You can complete this CPD from home or from school, but to ensure the bursary, please check that you are the only teacher from your school on the course.

Primary Programming and Algorithms – 31st March & 1st April

Primary Programming and Algorithms – 28th & 29th April

Introduction to Primary Computing – 21st & 22nd April

Select Newbury for remote learning.

Fully Funded Computing Support for Primary Schools!

National Centre for Computing Education
“Our vision is to achieve a world-leading computing education for every child in England.”

I am the SME (Subject Matter Expert) for primary schools in the South East (Hampshire, Isle of Wight & West Sussex) and I’d like to make you aware of the latest wave of support from the NCCE.

If you are in a Category 5 or 6 primary school, then you are eligable for fully funded support; which means a bursary of £185 per day (back to your school) when you send one teacher – per academic year – on one of our fully funded (free!) training courses.

In addition to this, you are entitled to half a day of SME support; meaning I will complete an action plan with you and assist in any way that I can to improve and develop your delivery of the computing curriculum. This may take the form of curriculum overview development, help with planning, any additional training, subject lead support and so on.

A wise use of your SME time would be to team up with other schools and pool your time together. For example, if you and 3 other computing leads from 4 different schools all gathered together, I could train/ assist/ support you for 2 whole days.

If you are not in my area but still a CAT 5/6 school, then please submit a request for SME support through this request form. Otherwise, please get in touch with me directly on p.wickins@stem.org.uk.

If you are not Category 5 or 6, then there are still loads of resources and lesson plans for download, free online courses and you can of course still attend the training courses for a small fee of £35 per teacher per day. Have a look at all this on the Teach Computing website.

I look forward to hearing from you!

primary computing NCCE Teach Computing

Physical computing; where do I start?

5 steps to getting the best out of physical computing in primary school

I’ve seen a lot of requests for help recently when it comes to teaching physical computing in KS2 using crumble and other micro controllers, so I thought I’d share my experiences on what works and how I’ve managed to get some fantastic projects from my year 5 and 6’s.

First off, it is mandatory that we teach physical systems within computing, or at least simulate them:-

Pupils should be taught to:

design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts

UK National Curriculum – Computing in Key Stage 2 – 2013

I’ve not seen too many examples of software that directly simulates physical systems; although there are some out there such as Flowol – software that allows direct mapping of algorithms as code to control and animate a simluation or ‘mimic’.

Primary Computing - Flowol Simulating physical systems

However, nothing can compare to pupils actually connecting power and control to physical components and seeing the movement, light or sensory interaction with the physical world. The learning and engagement is far superior, just as it would be if pupils were learning how to cartwheel rather than just looking at videos of someone doing one on a screen.

I highly recommend, if you are teaching or leading year 5 or 6, that your school purchase some kind of physical computing systems. These range from well known brand names like Lego Wedo and Lego Mindstorms, to the highly popular BBC Micro:bit and more independent, yet incredibly versatile controllers such as Redfern’s Crumble.

I do not have any affiliation with, nor do I receive any commission from any of these products and to date, my only real teaching experience is with Crumbles because that is simply what my schools invested in. However, I will attempt to give you an approach to physical computing which should encompass all different types of systems.

Step 1 – Know your kit

By knowing your kit, I don’t mean you need to be an expert in physical computing, coding, wiring etc. More that you’ve had a go yourself and can put together a working system. For me, it was the wiring that I had to get my head round. On a Crumble for example, the four connections at the bottom of the controller board are specifically for motors and there for also deliver power. The top two on the left receive the power and on the right deliver the power, so you can daisy chain components together, and the ABCD connections deliver the control (on, off, colour, inputs, outputs etc).

So have a play, make a working circuit (like the one in the video above), find out what the misconceptions are, think about making a wiring diagram (like the examples below) so you can help pupils as they use the kits for the first time.

Primary Computing crumble wiring diagram
Crumble wiring diagram showing 2 sparkles (LEDs), a servo and a switch
Primary Computing crumble wiring diagram 2
Crumble wiring diagram showing 2 sparkles (LEDs) top right, a servo bottom right, 2 motors middle bottom and a distance sensor middle left

Obviously these diagrams will change depending on which components you have and which ones you are teaching about in each particular session. You could get the children to create their own wiring diagrams after a guided session, where you are teaching about the flow of electricity, positive & negative and control.

Notice in the above diagrams I’ve used black wires for negative, red for positive and green/ yellow for control. It obviously doesn’t matter physically which colour wire you use for any connection, but I find it’s good practice (if you have enough of each colour!) to use this colour arrangement, as it is easier to ‘de-bug’ any issues and also prepare them for industry, where colour is extremely important!

Step 2 – Step in! (But one step at a time…)

As I said before, don’t wait until you think you’re an expert; just get started! Take it slow and give the children one component at a time. Pause regularly for discussion on how and why each component needs power AND control, what the difference is, and look at the sections of code needed each time.

This is how I set my classroom and initial lessons up:

  • Either with one laptop between two, or in the ICT suite, working in pairs.
  • Each pair has a crumble kit (I use plastic food containers from the pound shop, they seem to fit everything in!), with all components in it.
  • Introduce the crumble controller (white circuit board), how it plugs into the computer via USB, and get children to load up the crumble software. If controller is connected and working, it will say so in the software.
  • Power: find battery pack, I always get children to fit batteries themselves to practise getting them the right way round. Wire up the battery to the controller, showing them the only places where the battery should be connected (top left) using red and black wires, ensuring negative goes to negative and positive to positive. Discuss the importance of this, could do this in connection with electricity unit in science. Show them there is an on switch on battery and that the light turns red when there is a short circuit.
  • Pick a component (I always start with Sparkles) and ask children to study it closely, looking for signs and symbols. Maybe make them guess what it is before you reveal it’s an LED.
  • Identify positive and negative symbols on sparkle and on controller, wire them up using black and red wires.
  • Then discuss control; now that the LED is powered, how do we send signals to it? Discuss using a different colour wire, and that port D is always for controlling sparkles.
  • Once wired up, use the crumble software to activate the sparkle (note: the first sparkle in the chain is always numbered 0, the second is 1 etc)
  • Get children to loop either a flashing or colour changing LED. Once the loop is running, ask them to disconnect the USB cable from the computer. The sparkle continues to change, because the program has been loaded and stored in the controller.
  • Repeat this process for all the different types of components you have (servos, motors, switches, sensors etc). When running 40 min lessons, I found I could teach one, maybe 2 components per lesson, making sure everything is discussed and reasoned, and at the end of each session everything is packed away properly.
  • I got the children to save their code, so they can refer to it later when building their project. You can print screenshots out for them if they have computing folders/ books, as shown below.
  • NOTE: When coding servos, they will not move unless there is a ‘wait’ block after the movement, pausing for enough time for the servo to perform that movement.
Primary Computing Crumble Servo Code
Screenshot showing servo code (full rotation of servo, with pauses for servo to perform movement)

Step 3 – Design!

Now that the children have had experience in wiring and coding all of the crumble components, it’s time to get creative. This is where my philosophy might differ from other schools of thought…

I am an advocate of freedom in art, rather than a craft set by the teacher. If the whole class is making a similar project, prescribed and limited by the teacher’s subject knowledge or confidence, then I think the children miss out on possibly their only opportunity to really explore physical computing in primary school. Unless you have enough kits or time to run physical computing in other year groups, then you can’t afford to get them all making something mediocre. In your average 3 form entry school, with one class set of crumbles, I would allocate the kits to each class for a whole term, and go all out!

Therefore, I would open the brief right up and ask the children; ‘now that you’ve seen what the crumbles can do, what can you build?’ Allow plenty of time for discussion and ideas before committing to a design. I have used large A3 sheets of paper for children to freehand designs on and also 3D CAD software such as Sketchup (see screenshots below).

Most of the time I’d offer a choice of how children wanted to complete their designs, however it is essential that they do complete a design, for the following reasons:

  • It keeps them accountable; obviously they can alter their plans if they’ve designed something too hard to build, or realise they need to change the position of something, but ultimately they have a clear end goal and you can see if they are putting in enough effort to complete it.
  • They can refer back to it, scaffolding their own learning rather than them trying to wing it or argue with their partner about how it is to be done.
  • I’ve found that spending time on the design stage really helps to engage girls. They want their designs to look good and therefore are invested in the project from the beginning.
  • They can mark on their plans which elements they are confident with, and which areas you may need to spend some more time teaching on.
  • It can generate a resource list that you can ask them to collect and bring to school (if you don’t have a fully stocked DT cupboard!).

Step 4 – Can we build it? Yes we can!

I would recommend they wire up their circuit and test it first, making sure it works and does what they want it to. That way, they can build around the circuit, making sure that it’s not a case of squashing in the components, controller and power pack in after the model is finished (which, trust me, doesn’t work!).

Think of ways you can scaffold the learning in some areas, while challenging them in others. I usually give them the wiring diagram that we all created together in the exploring lessons, and make sure they have access to their coding screenshots. Then they can really focus on the building and assembling of their creations.

Step 5 – Celebrate and Evaluate

These magnificent autonomous creations are usually some of the best things pupils have ever created (at least from the point of view of adults!). Parents, SLT and teachers will marvel at the culmination of wiring, coding and building all done by children to produce these moving interactive robots. They are a must for parent’s evening showpieces, blog posts and all other manner of school promotional tools; all because our generation can’t quite believe that children have this kind of access and this kind of capacity for highly customisable programmable robotics.

Not only can the children evaluate as they would at the end of a normal DT project, but save the designs and models for next year’s cohort; to inspire and motivate. Most of all, share your amazing creations with other teachers; show them that it’s not that hard to teach and that every child deserves a chance to explore their innovative and inventive self!

I’d love to hear from you if you found this post helpful, especially if you have any physical computing creations you’d like to share or show off! I’ll leave you with some of my year 6’s creations…

Health & Wellbeing Conference 2019

I had the absolute pleasure of delivering 4 training sessions to PGCE and Schools Direct students at Southampton University, at their annual Health and Wellbeing conference – 10th Anniversary.

The morning lectures were on online safety, which I titled ‘Internet City; helping children navigate a safe and healthy path’. We covered everything from content and conduct, to testing and checking reliable sources of information.

The afternoon workshops were also about children’s online activity, but specifically how to engage parents. I strongly believe that our best line of defence against cyber bullying and keeping our pupils safe online is to bring parents on board through meaningful and supportive contact. This is a brand new workshop that I’ve developed recently and this was the first time I’ve delivered it. I’m very pleased to say it went really well and had both secondary and primary trainee teachers engaged and inspired.

The conference as a whole was a huge success, as it is every year. My only wish is that it could be expanded to include all teachers, not just trainees. I truly think that even the most experienced practitioners could benefit from the wealth of knowledge, techniques and up to date information regarding all aspects of pupil’s mental and physical health (as well as some very good tips for teacher’s wellbeing!).

If you are a parent reading this, or a teacher who would like to give advice to parents on the aspect of online safety, then this booklet is extremely useful. You can download it for free as a PDF, or I believe you can also order some for free for your school. Some absolutely brilliant advice and very interesting stats!

Digital Parenting by Vodafone and ParentZone

STEM – Associate Facilitator

I’m very proud to have received my certificate and pin to show that I am officially a STEM associate facilitator! So far I’ve delivered five courses for Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2 teachers, from Teaching and Leading Computing to Programming and Algorithms.

As the role of the NCCE (National Centre for Computing Education) develops to further support schools, my role will also change to include both CPD and supporting teachers by offering planning and curriculum advice, team teaching experiences, support with overviews and developing computing skills progression.

Please get in touch if this is something you think would benefit your school; there are heavily subsidised rates for schools in certain areas, particularly Portsmouth, Isle of Wight, Gosport and other areas of Hampshire.

Associate Facilitator STEM primary computing

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